YOUR OUTLOOK IS BETTER, WHATEVER THE WEATHER

Whatever the weather is doing, you’ll have more reliable farm inputs and outputs.

If drought is sustained, you can avoid further crisis.
If the rain comes, your pasture can recover faster and you can carry more stock per acre…
You can keep feeding sprouts, or maybe grow an extra crop.
If you prefer, you can stop growing fodder until it’s needed again.

In most situations, growing your own fodder under controlled conditions can…

* give you peace of mind
* support animal health
* boost your carrying potential
* give you more farm management options.

A GREAT START TO BETTER ANIMAL HEALTH







Barley is an ancient grain long-recognised for its nutrition and versatility.

A 6-day growth cycle optimises the energy and protein of the barley feed, and livestock thrive on it.
The evidence suggests sprouting barley significantly increases digestibility, while maintaining the same levels of energy and protein. Barley sprouts have less dry matter than hay, but are much more digestible.

That means that as a rich, green feed, ruminants can digest a higher proportion of the feed’s available protein and energy.

Those feeding sprouted fodder already know the resulting meat certainly tastes better too.

NATURALLY NUTRITIOUS



Clearly, one farm management goal may be to grow and harvest or pre-purchase barley or other grains in volumes sufficient to reduce your exposure to volatility or extremes in market price.

One (1) tonne of barley grain sprouts into approximately six (6) tonnes of fodder over the growing cycle of 6 days, which reduces the cost per tonne of fodder. Like all feed rations, nutritional content must be considered and managed to your desired requirements.

Below is a nutritional comparison for feeding barley sprouts compared to feeding oaten or wheaten hay.

Nutritional comparison of barley sprouts and cereal hay

We intend to run feed studies within our Growing Smarter community, however anecdotal feedback from producers globally suggests barley fodder has positive effects on animal wellbeing and meat quality beyond what these baseline measures of energy and protein would suggest.

GROWING GREEN FODDER

The optimal sprouting process takes place over a 6-day cycle.